Protecting Your Workplace Just Got a Little Easier…

Contributed by Julie Proscia

On August 16th, Gov. Quinn signed the Workplace Violence Prevention Act (WVPA or act). The WVPA is effective on January 1, 2014. The legislation applies to employers with five or more employees, and covers the prevention of violence, stalking and harassment. The WVPA allows employers to seek a court order of protection if the business or its employees are threatened by an individual, generally a disgruntled employee.

At least once a week, we counsel and advise employers about the disgruntled employee. It is always a difficult situation; do we keep an abusive employee or let them go and face their wrath? Employers are fearful that if they terminate a disgruntled employee, the individual will return to the business and harm both the people and property associated with the business. Now we work with our clients and local law enforcement agencies to effectuate the smoothest of separations, and try and prevent the individual from entering the property through anti-trespassing measures. We have also successfully fought in the courts for orders of protection. Unfortunately, until this act, there was no cogent statewide legislation for orders of protections that specifically addressed these non-domestic workplace scenarios. This act is meant to resolve this deficiency. As of January 1, 2014, employers who face a credible threat of violence may seek an order of protection to prevent and preclude the individual from entering the workplace and contacting their employee(s).

For an employer to obtain an order of protection under the act, they must show through an affidavit, to the satisfaction of a judge, that there is sufficient evidence that an employee has suffered a threat or there is a credible potential threat that could be faced by the workplace. A credible threat of violence is defined as a statement or course of conduct that does not serve a legitimate purpose and that causes a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or for the safety of the person’s immediate family.

This act does not supplant any current means or methods of seeking protection but gives employers both a shield and a sword to try and prevent workplace violence. In an era where employers are constantly subjected to additional legislation that makes it harder to do business, this is legislation that makes it easier. Put this one in the win column.