Category Archives: Illinois

Up in Smoke: Recreational Marijuana and its Impact on the Illinois Workplace

Contributed by Noah A. Frank, Michael D. Wong, and Jeffrey A. Risch, May 31, 2019

It appears Illinois will become the 11th state to permit recreational cannabis. Once Governor Pritzker signs the legislation, as promised, beginning January 1, 2020, the Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act (“Act”), will allow adults (21+) in Illinois to possess and consume cannabis. While there is a lot “rolled” into the 600 plus page law (pun intended), there are significant employment pitfalls for employers with regard to enforcing drug free workplaces.

Marijuana and a gavel

The Act expressly permits employers to adopt and enforce “reasonable” and nondiscriminatory zero tolerance and drug free workplace policies, including policies on drug testing, smoking, consumption, storage, and use of cannabis in the workplace or while on-call – which is good for employers.

However, the Act’s language indicates that employers are not allowed to take an adverse action against an applicant or employee for marijuana usage outside the workplace. This is bad for employers, as it makes it much more difficult for employers to identify and address use of marijuana by employees. In particular, the Act amends the Illinois Right to Privacy in the Workplace Act (“Right to Privacy Act”), which prohibits employers from restricting employees from using legal products outside of work. Specifically, the Right to Privacy Act is amended to provide that “lawful products” means products that are legal under state law, indicating that recreational and medical marijuana are legal products that must be treated like alcohol and tobacco. Thus, employers may not discriminate against an employee or applicant who lawfully uses cannabis (recreationally or medically) off-premises during nonworking and non-call hours. 

Much like with the Illinois medical marijuana law, the Act changes the emphasis from whether an employee “used” marijuana while employed, to whether the employee was “impaired” or “under the influence” of marijuana while at work or working. As a result, drug testing without any other evidence of the employee being impaired at work or while working will open the door to legal challenges. Specifically, refusing to hire, disciplining, terminating, refusing to return an employee to work or taking an adverse action against an employee or applicant who fails a pre-employment, random, or post-leave return to duty drug test for marijuana will arguably create a claim for the employee against an employer for a violation of Illinois law. For example, an employee who undergoes a urine drug test (which shows use of marijuana within 30-45 days) following a workplace accident may argue that “recreational cannabis was lawfully used outside of work, and the accident/injury was unrelated to the employee’s legal use of cannabis outside of work.” Without more than the drug test result, the employer would be in a vulnerable position to argue against or defend such a claim. However, if the employer completed a post-accident report, which included a reasonable suspicion checklist, in which a trained supervisor observed and recorded symptoms/behaviors of drug use, the employer would be in a much better position to take an adverse action against the employee and dispute any such claim by an employee based on the observations and positive drug test.

With the changes to the Right to Privacy Act, it is important for employers to understand the potential exposure and damages. Under the Right to Privacy Act, aggrieved employees can recover actual damages, costs, attorneys’ fees and fines. As such, employers should make sure their practices and procedures are practical in light of these changes, until and unless the legislature or a court provides further clarity. Of course, the Illinois Department of Labor can provide such clarity through administrative rulemaking. However, that will likely not happen any time soon. 

Interestingly, the Act neither diminishes nor enhances the protections afforded to registered patients under the medical cannabis and opioid pilot programs (while cannabis use is not protected under federal law, the underlying medical condition is likely an ADA and IHRA-covered disability!). Much like under the Illinois medical marijuana law, the Act appears to require employers to take an additional step before disciplining or terminating an employee based on a “good faith belief” that the employee was impaired or under the influence of cannabis while at work or performing the job. After the employer has made a “good faith belief” determination and drug tested the employee, but before disciplining or terminating an employee, the employer must provide the employee with a reasonable opportunity to contest that determination. Once the employee is provided a reasonable opportunity to explain, an employer may then make a final determination regarding its good faith belief that the employee was impaired or under the influence of cannabis while on the job or while working, and what, if any, adverse employment action it will take against the employee without violating the Act. Requiring an employee to go through drug testing is still currently the best practice as a positive drug test will provide additional support for a supervisor’s reasonable suspicion determination.

What Employers Should Do to Diminish Legal Risks and Protect ‎their Workforce?

  1. First, get educated and evaluate all policies and practices that touch on providing and ensuring a safe workplace, including job descriptions. Review the law. Talk to legal counsel on an intimate basis. Assess workplace cannabis-tolerance (in general) and implement policies that can be enforced consistently amongst similarly situated employees. Policies that should be reviewed (and that could be affected) include those addressing health and safety (including accident reporting, smoking, and distracted driving), equal employment opportunity policies, workplace search/privacy policies and drug testing policies. Companies should also review with legal counsel, their drug testing vendor as well as their Medical Review Officer, the drug testing methodology being used to make sure that such is producing results that are useful, accurate and well vetted.
  2. Second, ensure managers and supervisors are well trained and capable of enforcing policies. Remember – exceptions and favoritism lead to discrimination claims.  Conducting training, especially training on reasonable suspicion detection, will be necessary to avoid legal challenges to a supervisor’s reasonable suspicion determination. Creating and/or updating forms for accident reporting (including witness statements), reasonable suspicion checklists, and established protocols for addressing suspected impairment in the workplace, is now more critical than ever.
  3. Third, clearly communicate management’s position and policies to employees, especially where there is a shift in current policy or practice. Educate employees on the effect of lawful and unlawful drug use and the employer’s policies regarding marijuana.
  4. Fourth, engage competent legal counsel to assist you in this process and in addressing difficult situations before they lead to costly and time-consuming litigation.

Finally, stay tuned for further state and national developments in this growing area of law. Be assured that SmithAmundsen’s Labor & Employment Group will be presenting timely webinars and seminars on this subject in the coming weeks and months.

The New Year is Coming…Is Your Office Prepared with the Required Illinois Posters for 2019?

Contributed by Sara Zorich, November 20, 2018

As the holidays are quickly approaching and the hustle and bustle of the end of the year begins, it is important to focus on compliance for 2019. Illinois employers need to ensure that they have the required Illinois postings displayed in their workplaces. The following Illinois posters are required for the designated Illinois employers:

  1. NEW Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Poster (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS EMPLOYERS as of September 2018). In addition, employers should review the notice to employers which outlines information about the poster AND the additional posting requirements necessary in the Company’s handbook.
  2. NEW Illinois Service Member Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (ISERRA) Poster (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS EMPLOYERS by January 1, 2019). This is a new law applicable to public and private employers governing military service leave which aligns Illinois’ military law with the federal law USERRA. For private employers, there are some additional requirements beyond USERRA regarding performance reviews addressed in Section 330 ILCS 61/5-5(3) of the Act. This new law has NO IMPACT on the Illinois Family Military Leave Act which is still applicable law.
  3. Pregnancy Notice (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS EMPLOYERS)
  4. Know Your Rights Poster (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS EMPLOYERS)
  5. Workers Compensation (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS EMPLOYERS)
  6. Unemployment Insurance Benefits Notice (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS EMPLOYERS)
  7. Emergency Choking Notice (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS EMPLOYERS)
  8. Smoke Free Illinois Act Notice (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS EMPLOYERS)
  9. Sexual Harassment in Higher Education Act Poster (Required for those entities who are a public university, a public community college, or an independent, not-for-profit or for-profit higher education institution located in Illinois)
  10. Employee Classification Act of 2008 Poster (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS that have one or more individuals that are not classified as employees)
  11. Illinois Occupational Safety & Health Act Poster (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS PUBLIC SECTOR EMPLOYERS)
  12. Illinois Day and Temporary Labor Services Act (Required to be posted by ALL ILLINOIS TEMPORARY LABOR AGENCIES)

Breaking News! Illinois Senate Refuses to Override Governor’s Veto

Inquiry into Illinois Applicant’s Salary Inquiry Remains Lawful – For Now.

Contributed by Noah A. Frank, November 9, 2017

gavelWe previously reported that Governor Rauner’s August 25, 2017 veto of HB 2462 amending the Illinois Equal Pay Act related to applicant salary history inquiries was subject to be overridden by the General Assembly.  On October 25, 2017, as predicted, the Illinois House voted to override the veto by a vote of 80-33 (less than the initial vote of 91-24 to pass the bill).  On November 9, 2017, the Illinois Senate voted against overriding the veto.  While 29 senators favored overriding the veto, they were seven short of the 36 required to override the veto (and still less than the original 35 to vote to pass the bill).

The battle is not over. 

In his veto, Governor Rauner suggested that the General Assembly adopt legislation similar to another state’s law.  As such, employers should expect legislation in 2018 in line with this new national trend, and prepare to revise job applications and interview questions accordingly.  We will keep you abreast of future Illinois and national developments.

Illinois Employer Faces Class Action for Using Fingerprints to Track Attendance

Contributed by Suzanne Newcomb, October 5, 2017

Data Protection Keyboard

Technology allowing employers to use biometric data tools to track attendance and maintain worksite security abounds. Purveyors hype the advanced technology’s ability to accurately validate time entries, eliminate fraud, and better control access to the workplace or to sensitive areas within the workplace. If these systems are so readily available, it must be legal for employers to use them, right? As with seemingly everything involving HR and the workplace, it depends.

Last week, a group of Chicago-area employees filed a class action suit, alleging their employer’s use of worker fingerprints for time-tracking purposes violates the state’s biometric information privacy law. Specifically, the employees claimed that their employer failed to:

  • Properly inform them in writing of the specific purpose for which their fingerprints were being collected and the length of time their fingerprints would be stored and used;
  • Provide a publically available retention schedule and guidelines for permanently destroying their fingerprints; and
  • Obtain their written consent before obtaining fingerprints.

In 2008, Illinois became the first state to explicitly regulate the use of “biometric identifiers” which it defines as a retina or iris scan, fingerprint, voiceprint, or scan of hand or face geometry and their derivatives, regardless of how that information is captured, converted, stored, or shared. 740 ILCS 14/10. The Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) applies broadly to any individual or entity other than the government, and therefore encompasses all private-sector employers operating within the state.

Illinois Biometrics Legislation Sets Trend

Until recently, Illinois and Texas were the only states with laws addressing biometrics. However, a new wave of high-exposure litigation under BIPA has had an impact on other states’ decisions to introduce legislation on the matter. Many states, including Illinois, have data breach notification laws that cover biometric information, as well as other sensitive personal information.

Employers operating exclusively in jurisdictions that have not regulated the use of biometric information specifically could still face breach of privacy or negligence claims if their employee’s biometric information is compromised.

Tips for Employers

Due to the growing number of data breaches, employers are encouraged to ensure they have protocols in place to safeguard all of the personal information they possess, particularly biometric information.

Whether you are thinking about adopting and using biometric data or have already implemented this technology, it is vital that employers take the following steps before collecting any biometric data to ensure their use complies with the growing regulation in this area:

  1. Assemble a team of experienced legal, cyber-security, and data-breach experts prior to selecting or implementing any technology that uses biometrics. Involve this team in vetting potential vendors, negotiating the terms of vendor contracts, and developing protocols.
  2. Carefully draft policies and procedures to safeguard and properly destroy biometric information, as well as protocols in case of a breach. Ensure those policies, procedures, and protocols (and those of your outside vendors) comply with all applicable laws, including notice and disclosure requirements.
  3. Clearly disclose to your employees, in writing, your intent to collect and use biometric information, the ways the information will be used, the means by which the information will be collected, maintained, and eventually destroyed, as well as the safeguards the company has put in place to secure this information.
  4. Obtain each employee’s informed written content prior to collecting any biometric information. Consider good faith objections and requests for accommodation and analyze and address those requests in accordance with all applicable laws.
  5. Continue to monitor changing federal, state and local regulations in this area.