Tag Archives: Chicago Paid Sick Leave Ordinance

The Impact of Local Minimum Wage and Paid Sick Leave Ordinances on the Transportation Industry

Contributed by Michael Wong, January 5, 2018

Over the past few years, cities, counties and local municipalities have been enacting laws and ordinances increasing the minimum wage and requiring paid sick leave for employees. While there have been growing pains with how these apply to normal hourly non-exempt employees and tipped servers, do these apply to motor carriers and employees who are truck drivers?  This can be the most frustrating legal response of all, “it depends.”

In most cases, minimum wage laws enacted by states follow the Fair Labor Standard Act (“FLSA”) and provide exemptions for motor carriers.  Indeed, under Section 12(b)(1) of the FLSA, employees whose duties, wholly or in part, affect the safety of operation of a motor vehicle and are involved in interstate commerce are exempt from being paid overtime. Whether a municipality’s minimum wage ordinance applies, depends on the language and rules of the ordinance. For example, the rules of the Cook County, Illinois minimum wage specifically state that a regulated motor carrier subject to subsection 3(d)(7) of the Illinois Minimum Wage Law is not a “Covered Employer” that would be required to pay covered employees the Chicago or Cook County minimum wage. Similarly, the rules of the City of Chicago minimum wage states that individuals employed for a motor carrier who are subject to the Department of Transportation regulation are not subject to the Chicago minimum wage.

However, paid sick leave laws and ordinances are different.  Neither the Cook County, Illinois earned sick leave ordinance or City of Chicago earned sick leave ordinance have the same exclusion for motor carriers or truck drivers.  While neither expressly states that motor carriers are required to provide paid sick leave to employees who are truck drivers, they also do not state that motor carriers or truck drivers are exempt.  Due to the plain language exempting motor carriers and truck drivers from the minimum wage ordinances, there is a very strong argument that motor carriers are required to provide their employees who are truck drivers with paid sick leave.

Indeed, this interpretation is not unusual within the growing trend of states, cities and local municipalities expanding employee rights – including those of truck drivers. Currently there are 8 states and 30 cities and municipalities that have paid sick leave laws which include:  Illinois (local), Washington (state and local), California (state and local), Arizona (state and local), Oregon (state and local), Minnesota (local), Vermont (state), Massachusetts (state and local), Pennsylvania (local), New Jersey (local), New York (local), Connecticut (state) and Washington, D.C. (local).

Bottom line, the different paid sick leave laws do not address or expressly exempt motor carriers or truck drivers from being subject to the law or ordinance. By not addressing or expressly exempting motor carriers and their employees, these laws are creating significant exposure for motor carriers that fail to make changes by providing employees who are truck drivers with the ability to earn paid sick leave or considering how those employees are being compensated. Certainly, with the patchwork of laws and nuances in each jurisdiction, it can be extremely frustrating and difficult to try and implement a globally compliant policy.  Thus, special attention must be taken when crafting such policies and review by experienced counsel should be part of the process.  Moreover, motor carriers utilizing truck drivers who are independent contractors or owner/operators should take particular pause to consider the increased liability from misclassification claims and the potential damages under the paid sick leave laws, in addition to any applicable minimum wage law or ordinance.

House Republicans Try to Remedy Patchwork of Paid Sick Leave

Contributed by Beverly Alfon, November 10, 2017

Eight states, the District of Columbia, and more than 30 municipalities have enacted laws mandating differing paid leave requirements. Localities such as New York and San Francisco, have enacted some of the most aggressive sick leave requirements in the country. Employers doing business within the City of Chicago have also been left to deal with a trifecta of sick leave laws in 2017:  the IL Employee Sick Leave Act, the Cook County Paid Sick Leave ordinance, and the City of Chicago paid sick leave ordinance. All of this has resulted in an administrative nightmare for employers dealing with more than one set of sick leave requirements.

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On November 2, 2017, three Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives, Reps. Mimi Walters (R-CA), Elise Stefanik (R-NY) and Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), introduced a bill, The Workflex in the 21st Century Act (H.R. 4219). Supporters of the bill tout that the legislation gives employees job flexibility, while also giving employers more certainty and predictability over their leave practices. The bill provides for a voluntary program that is comprised of a combination of guaranteed paid leave and increased workplace flexibility options to employees. The amount of paid leave required (ranging from 12 days up to 20 days) would depend on an employee’s tenure and the employer’s size.  At least one type of workflex option would also be made available to employees, which may include a compressed work schedule, biweekly work program, telecommuting program, job-sharing program, flexible scheduling or a predictable schedule.  The incentive for an employer is that participation in the program would shield it from the mish-mosh of paid leave obligations stemming from state and local laws currently in effect.

The bill would not require employees to use the workflex option in order to take advantage of the paid days off. Also, to be eligible for a workflex arrangement, an employee would have to be employed for at least 12 months by the employer and would have to have worked at least 1,000 hours during the previous 12 months. More details regarding the bill can be found here.

Bottom line: Where this bill will end up obviously remains to be seen, but it has strong support from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, National Association of Manufacturers, National Association of Women Business Owners and other employer groups. Until there is a solution to the administrative hopscotch required of employers whose employees work in different cities, counties and states, employers must do their best to stay on top of the applicable paid sick leave requirements and related rules and regulations, and adjust their policies and procedures accordingly.

City of Chicago Approves Paid Sick Time and Reminder… Chicago Minimum Wage Increases to $10.50 on July 1, 2016

Contributed by Sara Zorich and Mike Wong, June 28, 2016

City of Chicago Approves Paid Sick Time

On June 21, 2016, we posted a blog on the City of Chicago’s proposed ordinance mandating paid sick leave, including details about who it covers and how it could impact business owners.

On Wednesday, June 22nd, the full City council passed the ordinance. Effective July 1, 2017, part time and full time employees in Chicago will accrue 1 hour of sick leave for every 40 hours they work – with a cap of 5 days paid leave per 12 month period.

Employers can utilize their existing paid time off policies if they are more generous than the Chicago ordinance; however, the ordinance REQUIRES mandatory carry-over of accrued but unused sick time, which is something many paid time off policies do not allow. Chicago employers should begin reviewing their current sick time or paid time off policies to ensure compliance with the ordinance.  If Chicago employers do not have any policies in place, they will want to do so by July 2017.

Reminder… Chicago Minimum Wage Increases to $10.50 on July 1, 2016

Minimum WageLast year, the Chicago Minimum Wage Ordinance went into effect. This ordinance requires a mandatory yearly increase to the Chicago minimum wage. As of July 1, 2016, the Chicago Minimum Wage increases to $10.50/hr and the minimum wage for tipped employees increases to $5.95/hr with an applicable tip credit of $4.55 (i.e., $10.50 minus $5.95).

Unless an employee is exempt from overtime under the Illinois Minimum Wage Law (IMWL), employers subject to the Chicago Ordinance must pay employees overtime of 1.5 times the City’s minimum wage. This means that on July 1st, 2016, the Chicago’s minimum overtime wage will be $15.75 per hour (i.e. $10.50 times 1.5) and the overtime rate for tipped employees is $11.20 (i.e. $15.75 – $4.55).

Employers should check their record keeping and payroll systems to ensure this change is implemented as of July 1, 2016.