Tag Archives: Department of Labor Final Rule

US DOL Issues Final Rule on Salary Threshold for Exempt Status

Contributed by Sara Zorich, September 24, 2019

In a follow up to our recent post, the US Department of Labor (DOL) has now issued its final rule regarding the salary thresholds for exempt status. The final rule will go into effect on January 1, 2020 and establishes the following rules:

  1. Salary exempt employees must earn at least $684/week (equivalent to $35,568 per year for a full-year worker) (which is slightly more than was proposed in March 2019 due to inflation/updated data but less than was proposed during the Obama Era);
  2. Employers can use non-discretionary bonuses and incentive payments that are paid at least annually to satisfy up to 10% of the salary basis for the white collar exemptions (if this is utilized the minimum salary paid can be no less than $615.60/week) (however, it should be noted that (1) if the employee does not earn the bonus the employer will need to pay the amount anyway no later than one week from the end of the 52 week period or the salary basis will not be met and (2) if the employee leaves employment before the bonus is paid/earned the employer will have to pay the pro-rata share of the bonus at termination to ensure the minimum salary threshold was met);
  3. In order to qualify for the “highly compensated exemption” employees must earn at least $107,432/year (formerly $100,000/year) and must be paid at least $684/week (however, Illinois employers should note this is not applicable in Illinois because Illinois did not adopt the highly compensated exemption); and
  4. Revises the special salary level for the motion picture industry and US territories.

We anticipate the new rule will receive legal challenge. However, litigation is unpredictable, so employers should begin preparing now to ensure they are ready for January 1, 2020.

Association Health Plans Expanded Under DOL Final Rule

Contributed by Kelly Haab-Tallitsch, July 10, 2018

12837750 - stethoscope wrapped around health insurance policies, soft focusOn June 21, 2018, the US Department of Labor (DOL) published a final rule making it easier for a group or association of small employers to band together to buy health insurance.  The rule allows employers that previously could only purchase small group health coverage to join together to purchase insurance in the less-regulated large group market.

The rule broadens the definition of an “association” that can act as a single “employer” to sponsor an Association Health Plan (AHP) under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). Employers that pass a “commonality of interest” test based on geography or industry can form an association for the sole purpose of offering an AHP to their employees.

Under the new rule employers can show a commonality of interest if they are:

  • In the same trade, industry or profession throughout the United States; or
  • In the same principal place of business within the same state or a common metropolitan area, even if the metro area extends across state lines.

Potential Benefits

In most states employers with less than 50 employees must purchase health coverage in the small group market, which is subject to greater regulation (a few states set the cut off at 100 employees). Under the new rule, an association of employers with a total of 50 (or 100) or more employees among them will have access to the large group market. Why does this matter? Large group plans are exempt from some of the regulatory requirements imposed on small group health plans by states and the Affordable Care Act (ACA), including the requirement to provide coverage for 10 essential health benefits.  This will allow an AHP to offer a “skinnier” (and cheaper) plan than those available in the small group market.

AHPs may also help employers leverage the bargaining power of a larger group and reduce administrative costs through economies of scale. The regulations also enable AHPs to self-insure, subject to state oversight, an option not previously available to most small employers. Sole proprietors may also participate in an AHP.

Considerations

AHPs are still subject to nondiscrimination regulations. Coverage of an individual cannot be restricted based on any health factor or denied based on a preexisting condition.

Because AHPs are not subject to the same rules as small group health plans, employers must read the fine print and understand the details of the coverage they are purchasing.  AHPs are closely regulated by state and federal regulations and compliance will continue to be complex. AHPs are a type of a multiple employer welfare arrangement (MEWA), which are generally required to file a Form M-1 and a Form 5500 annually unless otherwise exempt.

Implementation Timeline

The new rule will be phased in beginning in September 2018, at which time fully-insured AHPs may begin to operate under the rule. Existing self-insured AHPs may begin to operate under the new rule on January 1, 2019 and new self-insured AHPs can begin on April 1, 2019.