Tag Archives: DOL Final Rule

UPDATED 11/22/2017: Deadline to Electronically Submit OSHA Data

Contributed by Matthew Horn, November 21, 2017

BREAKING NEWS: In follow up to our blog from yesterday, OSHA issued a press release this morning extending the deadline to electronically report from 12/1 to 12/15. All other information in the blog remains unchanged.
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On June 27, 2017, OSHA issued a press release announcing that it would be delaying the compliance date for its Rule requiring most employers to electronically submit their injury and illness data to OSHA. The press release pushed back the compliance date four months, from July 1, 2017 to December 1, 2017, so OSHA could review the Rule closely.

Dec1Just over two weeks later, OSHA issued another press release announcing that it would be launching its website allowing employers to submit their injury and illness data on August 1, 2017. On August 1, 2017, OSHA made good on that promise and launched its website, which is linked here. To date, despite OSHA’s promise to review the Rule closely, it has taken no action to roll back or delay the electronic reporting requirements, so the December 1st deadline remains.

Under the Rule, virtually all employers with twenty or more employees are required to submit their completed Form 300A for 2016 by December 1, 2017. In 2018, employers with twenty or more employees must submit their completed Form 300A for 2017 by July 1, 2018, and those employers with more than 250 employees must submit their Form 300 and 301s by that deadline, as well.

While we were hoping OSHA would roll back or delay the Rule, it appears that is not going to happen. Accordingly, all applicable employers would be well-served submitting their data online no later than December 1st.

IMPORTANT DOL UPDATE: The Final Rule on Doubling White Collar Salaries Is Shot Down By Texas Judge

Contributed by Heather Bailey, September 6, 2017

31096470 - concept of time with businessman that hold an alarm clock

Concept of time with businessman holding a clock

Previously, we reported to you on the U.S. Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) Final Rule that raised the minimum salary threshold required to qualify for the Fair Labor Standards Act’s (“FLSA”) “white-collar” exemptions (executive, professional and administrative classification) from $455 per week ($23,660 annually) to $913 per week ($47,476 annually) as of December 1, 2016 (see our prior articles: U.S. DOL Publishes Final Overtime Rule and; Are you ready for December 1st? The FLSA Salary Changes Are Almost Here).

The Obama administration’s goal with this Final Rule, announced on 5/23/2016, was to give approximately 4 million workers the ability to earn overtime pay, instead of getting paid a fixed salary since many employers would not be able to afford to pay their otherwise exempt employees $47,476 annually. Implementation of this new rule had been temporarily stalled in a federal court in Texas just prior to it going into effect this past December 1st (see our prior articles: Court Enjoins DOL Overtime Rule and; Business Realities Under the Halted DOL Final Overtime Rule).

However, on August 31, 2017, Judge Amos L. Mazzant of the United States District Court, Eastern District of Texas answered many business owners’ prayers by ruling the DOL indeed exceeded its authority by more than doubling the minimum salary threshold for exempting white-collar employees (see the full case here).

The judge did not say the DOL could not raise the minimum salary at all. Rather, relying heavily on Chevron, USA, Inc. v. Nat. Res. Def. Council, Inc., 467 U.S. 837 (1984), the judge stated that by more than doubling the current minimum threshold, the DOL effectively eliminated the need for looking to the employees’ actual duties and responsibilities—which was the essence of Congress’s intent when it created the FLSA white collar exemptions. The judge looked to the plain meaning of what it means to work in an executive, administrative and professional capacity concluding the primary focus was not the salary minimum but instead the actual duties and responsibilities.

What are the ramifications? The Department of Justice voluntarily dismissed its appeal of Judge Mazzant’s earlier preliminary injunction ruling putting the Final Rule on hold, so it seems unlikely it will appeal this ruling. However, this decision could catapult the Trump administration to issue a new rule providing for a more moderate increase in the minimum salary threshold – one that does not vitiate the primary focus of the “white collar” overtime exemptions: the employees’ actual duties and responsibilities.

Practice Tips:

  • The good news for now is that employers can continue to follow the previous DOL regulations for white collar exemptions (i.e., duties test and salary test).
  • If you did not do so previously, analyze your exempt positions to confirm they meet the duties test and are truly exempt positions. For example, is your manager truly a manager or is she really a lead worker? Is this manager hiring, firing and disciplining two or more employees?  Is your payroll clerk clearly just doing data entry or is he exercising independent discretion and judgment?  If the position does not meet the duties test, you transitioning the position to make it overtime eligible.
  • Ensure management is trained to enforce policies related to overtime pay such as those relating to working time, time clock procedures, meal and rest breaks, working off the clock issues, etc.
  • Did you already make changes to your employees’ pay or duties based upon the final rule going into effect on December 1, 2016?  While there are ways to change those decisions (i.e., you can change an employee’s pay moving forward for work not yet performed), you need to keep in mind morale issues for employees whose compensation may decrease either by way of a salary reduction or loss of overtime pay.  In these situations, it is highly recommended that you work with your counsel on determining the best practices for your business and your workforce.

With the judge’s ruling, many business owners will be able to find some comfort in being able to keep their exempt employees on a reasonable salary without having to break the bank.

Federal Contractors: Paid Sick Leave Is Now A Reality

Contributed by Heather Bailey, October 21, 2016

On September 7, 2015, President Obama signed Executive Order 13706 requiring federal contractors to provide paid sick leave to their employees – up to 7 days annually. The leave is related to an employee’s own illness or injury, including, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking absences, and for family care for same. The Department of Labor published its Final Rule just over a year later on September 30, 2016.

pay-overtimeHere are the key components:

  • The Final Rule applies to any new federal contracts solicited on or after January 1, 2017, replacement contracts (for those that are expiring) that are solicited on or after January 1, 2017, and contracts awarded outside of any solicitations on or after January 1, 2017.
  • The Final Rule covers procurement contracts for construction under the Davis-Bacon Act (contracts subject only to DB Related Acts — for example where a federal agency provides financial assistance or insurance but does not directly procure construction services — are excluded); service contracts covered by McNamara-O’Hara Service Contract Act; concessions contracts; and federal property or lands contracts, including contracts related to offering services to federal employees or the general public.
  • Good news for banks and financial institutions: unless you are otherwise covered by the above contracts, this Final Rule does not apply to you since “money” alone is not considered federal property.
  • Accrual = 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours the employee works on or related to a covered contract up to a maximum of 56 hours each year.
  • Employers who do not want to track accrual hours may give employees a bank of at least 56 hours of sick leave to use throughout the accrual year.
  • Employees must be notified in writing at the end of each pay period or month (whichever is shorter) of the amount of paid sick leave available to them.
  • Any accrued but unused leave must carry over year to year, but the Final Rule imposes no obligation to pay out the sick leave bank upon termination of employment (although state law may, so be sure to check state laws on this topic of payout of earned vacation, sick, PTO, etc. to ensure compliance).
  • Employees can take the leave in increments as low as 1 hour.
  • All rejections of sick leave requests must be in writing and state the reason for the denial. That reason cannot be no replacement worker was found or the operational needs of the company.
  • Certification can only be required for absences of 3 or more days and with prior notice if the employee needs to certify his/her return to work.
  • Here is your new poster.

The good news is the Family Medical Leave Act leave runs concurrently with this new paid sick leave and you can use your existing paid time off policies so long as the rights and benefits meet or exceed the requirements of the Final Rule.

The DOL’s Final Rule can be found here and Fact Sheet, here.

With the new and ever changing paid sick leave laws in various states, cities and locales, it is a good idea to reconcile them all (including CBAs) with these new requirements to ensure compliance so you don’t get hit with a penalty to pay damages or worse, debarment.