Tag Archives: DOL Overtime Rule

DOL Announces Long-Awaited Proposed OT Rule

Contributed by Carlos Arévalo and Sara Zorich, March 11, 2019

Overtime – blue binder in the office

As a follow up to our March 4th blog, three days later the DOL announced a proposed OT rule increasing the minimum salary required for an employee to qualify for exemption from federal overtime pay requirements. The proposed increase in salary level is from $455 per week ($23,660 annually) to $679 per week ($35,308 annually). In addition, the proposed rule includes the following changes: 

  • The proposal increases the total annual compensation requirement for “highly compensated employees” from the currently-enforced level of $100,000 to $147,414 per year (note, this overtime exemption is not applicable in Illinois as it was not adopted by the Illinois Minimum Wage Law);
  • A commitment to periodic review to update the salary threshold, but not an automatic adjustment as was the case with the 2016 proposed rule. Updates would continue to require notice-and-comment rulemaking;
  • A special salary level for Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, a separate special salary level for American Samoa and an updated special weekly “base rate” for the motion picture producing industry; and
  • Allowing employers to use nondiscretionary bonuses and incentive payments (including commissions) that are paid annually or more frequently to satisfy up to 10 percent of the standard salary level, which was also part of the 2016 proposed rule. (Note, the proposed rule would allow a one-time yearly catch up payment if the employee does not earn the anticipated bonuses. The proposed rule states that as long as an employer pays 90% of the standard level ($611.10) and if at the end of the 52-week period the salary paid plus the nondiscretionary bonuses and incentive payments (including commissions) paid does not equal the standard salary level for 52 weeks ($35,308), the employer would have one pay period to make up for the shortfall (up to 10 percent of the standard salary level, $3,530.80).) 

There were no changes to overtime protections for police officers, firefighters, paramedics or nurses. There were also no changes impacting laborers including non-management production-line or non-management employees in maintenance, construction and related occupations.   

Most notably, the proposed rule stayed away from any changes to the job duties test.  We anticipate legal challenges to the proposed rule may be lodged by both the business community and employee rights groups as this rulemaking is a significant change from the current law and a deviation from the 2016 proposed rule.  Employers will have 60 days to submit comments to the DOL. Once the comments are considered, the DOL will issue and publish a final rule. In light of the proposed rule, we encourage employers to begin examining how it might impact them. This includes review of applicable state law as employers are required to comply with whichever law is most favorable to employees. We will be available to address any concerns or questions you may have.  And as always, we will keep an eye on any other developments and will keep you updated. 

Déjà Vu All Over Again? DOL Appeals Overtime Rule

Contributed by JT Charron, December 1, 2017

At this time last year, employers across the country were preparing for implementation of the DOL Final Overtime Rule, which would have more than doubled the minimum salary level for exempt employees. At the eleventh hour, employers were granted a reprieve when the Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Texas temporarily halted implementation, which was subsequently made permanent in August of this year.

In the interim, a presidential election occurred. And with the change in administration came uncertainty about what—if any—action the DOL would take regarding the now-defunct overtime regulations. We began to get answers following Alexander Acosta’s appointment as Secretary of Labor. Since his confirmation hearing in March Acosta has repeatedly stated that—while the jump to $47,476 was excessive—the salary level test should be increased to somewhere between $30,000 and $35,000.

In July, the DOL followed up on Acosta’s comments by issuing a request for information (RFI) regarding the overtime exemptions. The RFI sought responses to eleven sets of questions pertaining to the overtime exemptions, including questions regarding whether annual indexing of the salary test would be appropriate and the impact on the wages of exempt employees caused by the anticipation of the 2016 Final Rule. The comment period ended on September 25, 2017, with the DOL receiving over 200,000 comments.

On October 30, 2017, the DOL filed its appeal of the Texas court’s decision to permanently block the overtime rule. That appeal has been stayed while the DOL develops new overtime regulations. To be sure, the DOL is appealing this decision for one reason—to preserve its authority to revise the salary level test. In both its earlier decisions, the District Court repeatedly emphasized that the duties—not salary level—test should control the determination of exempt positions.

In its August 31 decision the Court attempted to clarify, in a footnote, that it was “not making any assessments regarding the general lawfulness of the salary-level test or the Departments authority to implement such a test.” However, the broad language used elsewhere in the opinion, is difficult to square with this narrow holding. In fact, in its appeal of the preliminary injunction—which was later dismissed as moot—the DOL asked the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals to “address only the threshold legal question of the Department’s statutory authority to set a salary level, without addressing the specific salary level set by the 2016 final rule.” We expect the DOL to take a similar stance in the instant appeal.

What’s Next

There is nothing employers need to do at this point. The DOL is currently reviewing the comments it received in response to its RFI, after which it will publish a notice of proposed rulemaking. Following that notice there will be a comment period prior to the issuance of any new regulations. Although it could be months—or years—before we see any new regulations, we fully expect that the current salary level will be increased, the only question is by how much. Stayed tuned – we will keep an eye on any action by the DOL and will keep you updated!

OVERTIME RULE UPDATE – DOL APPEALS PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION

Contributed by Noah A. Frank

As we previously reported, on 11/22/2016, Judge Amos Mazzant (E.D. Texas) granted a preliminary injunction that halted the 12/1/2016 implementation of the DOL’s Final Overtime Rule, which would have more-than-doubled the minimum salary level for executive/administrative/professional exempt employees.Wage-Hour2

On 12/1/2016, the U.S. DOL filed a notice of appeal to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, indicating that it strongly believes that the DOL followed all required administrative processes, and there is no reason to delay implementation of the Final Rule.

This fight is not over. Employers that have not yet undertaken serious analysis of the duties of claimed exempt positions should do so promptly and determine the strategies they will implement should the injunction be vacated. Stay tuned for further news and analysis of this hotly evolving issue.

URGENT ALERT: Court Enjoins DOL Overtime Rule!

Contributed by Noah A. Frank, November 23, 2016

On November 22, 2016, a Texas federal district court granted a nationwide preliminary injunction against the U.S. Department of Labor’s overtime rule. State of Nevada v. U.S. Dept. of Labor, No. 4:16-cv-00731-ALM (E.D. Tex. 11/22/2016).

This injunction halted the rule’s December 1, 2016 implementation that would have more-than-doubled the salary level to $913 per week for overtime-exempt executive, administrative, and professional white collar workers.

We will provide additional details on what this preliminary injunction means for employers after the Thanksgiving holiday.