Tag Archives: Family First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)

Does a “Shelter in Place” or “Stay at Home Order” Trigger Paid Leave under the FFCRA?

Contributed by John Hayes, March 31, 2020

Clock and cash

***Please see updated information on FFCRA regulations in our April 3, 2020 post.

A component of the recently passed Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) requires covered employers to provide employees with paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave for specified reasons related to COVID-19 starting April 1. Additionally, many states and local governments have now mandated that non-essential businesses close and that its citizens stay at home, subject to certain exceptions, often referred to as Shelter in Place (SIP) or Stay at Home orders.

The question facing many employers now is whether these SIP orders trigger the paid leave requirements of the FFCRA.

The short answer is no.

On March 28, 2020 the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued guidance to address, among other things, the FFCRA provisions related to paid sick leave or expanded medical leave, and whether employers are required to provide paid leave under its provisions if it is forced to close pursuant to SIP orders.  The specific questions that address the provisions for the closure of a worksite can be found on the DOL website and the relevant portions of the answers read as follows:

If my employer closes my worksite on or after April 1, 2020 (the effective date of the FFCRA), but before I go out on leave, can I still get paid sick leave and/or expanded family and medical leave?

No. If your employer closes after the FFCRA’s effective date (even if you requested leave prior to the closure), you will not get paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave but you may be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits. This is true whether your employer closes your worksite for lack of business or because it was required to close pursuant to a Federal, State or local directive.

If my employer closes my worksite while I am on paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave, what happens?

If your employer closes while you are on paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave, your employer must pay for any paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave you used before the employer closed. As of the date your employer closes your worksite, you are no longer entitled to paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave, but you may be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits. This is true whether your employer closes your worksite for lack of business or because the employer was required to close pursuant to a Federal, State or local directive.

If my employer closes my worksite on or after April 1, 2020 (the effective date of the FFCRA), but tells me that it will reopen at some time in the future, can I receive paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave?

No, not while your worksite is closed. If your employer closes your worksite, even for a short period of time, you are not entitled to take paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave. However, you may be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits. This is true whether your employer closes your worksite for lack of business or because it was required to close pursuant to a Federal, State, or local directive. If your employer reopens and you resume work, you would then be eligible for paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave as warranted.

Bottom line: an employee is not eligible for the paid leave requirements of the FFCRA if their worksite closes down pursuant to an SIP order, or if it closes for any other reason, such as lack of business. However, employers should note that when they reopen and recall the affected employees to work, the recalled employees will be eligible for paid sick or family leave, if they meet the requirements under FFCRA. 

Regular Rate of Pay under the FFCRA – It’s Not Necessarily the Base Wage

By Sara Zorich and Michael Wong, March 27, 2020

wage and hour

For purposes of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), the regular rate of pay used to calculate an employee’s paid leave is not necessarily the employee’s base wage or salary.  According to the Department of Labor (DOL) FAQs regarding the FFCRA, the pay rate for an employee’s FFCRA leave is the average of the employee’s regular rate over a period of up to six months prior to the date the employee takes the leave.  If the employee has not worked for the employer for at least six months, the regular rate used to calculate any FFCRA paid leave is the average of the employee’s regular rate of pay for each week the employee has worked for the employer.

In order to determine an employee’s regular rate for a workweek under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the formula is: Total compensation in the workweek (except for statutory exclusions) ÷ Total hours worked in the workweek = Regular Rate for the workweek.

*Note, some states may have different regular rate calculations and items that are “excludable”.

For purposes of the FFCRA regular rate, employers have 2 options:

  • An employer can review the weekly regular rate for a period of up to six months prior to the date the employee takes the leave and average all of those regular rates; OR
  • An employer can compute the regular rate by adding all compensation that is part of the regular rate for the period of up to six months prior to the date the employee takes the leave and divides that sum by all hours actually worked in the same period.

Note, when determining the regular rate, if an employee is paid with commissions, tips, or piece rates, non-discretionary bonuses, those wages will be also need to be incorporated into the regular rate of pay calculation.

Under the FLSA, the following can be excluded from the regular rate IF there is no connection to hours worked and the employer has not agreed to include them as hours worked: gifts, business expenses, travel expenses, discretionary bonuses, vacation pay, holiday pay, illness pay, gym memberships, parking, wellness programs, profit sharing plans, employer contributions to retirement plans, stock options and premium overtime pay. (See Fact Sheet #56A for additional information). However, employers should review their policies and procedures to determine if they have any agreements to include otherwise excludable items in an employee’s regular rate of pay.

EXAMPLES –

  • On April 1, 2020, Joe is diagnosed with COVID-19 and quarantined.  He is entitled to Paid Sick Leave and makes $100,000 per year for working 40 hours a week. Under the FFCRA, he is entitled to two weeks at 100% of his regular rate, but not more than $511.00 per day.  Joe’s only compensation was his salary. When an employee is paid solely on a weekly salary, the employee’s regular rate is computed by dividing the salary by the number of hours which the salary is intended to compensate.  Joe’s regular rate is $50,000 ÷ 26 weeks (6 months) ÷ 40 hours per week = $48.08 per hour.  Under the FFCRA he would get $384.62 per day or $1,923.08 – which would be his normal salary because his salary is not above the $511 cap.
  • John advises his employer that he has to stay home to care for his children because their school is closed under state order.  He makes a base salary of $50,000 per year for working 40 hours a week and gets quarterly bonuses of $10,000 based on meeting performance goals. Under the FFCRA, he is entitled to two weeks at 2/3 his regular rate, but not more than $200.00 per day.  Since John receives a non-discretionary quarterly bonus of $10,000, that must be included in calculating his regular rate. During the past 6 months, John’s compensation would be $25,000 in salary wages and $20,000 in non-discretionary bonuses. John’s regular rate is $45,000 ÷ 26 weeks (6 months) ÷ 40 hours per week = $43.27 per hour/$346.15 per day.  Under the Paid Sick Leave he would get 2/3 of his regular rate so $346.15 x 2/3 = $230.77 per day – However, since it is above the cap of $200 per day, he would receive the max of $200 per day or $1,000 per week.

In summary, when an employee requests FFCRA leave, the employer will at that time need to determine the employee’s regular rate of pay for the paid FFCRA leave.

Counting to 500 Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

Contributed by Peter Hansen, March 26, 2020

a 3d human character a question mark

As many of you know, employers with 500 or more employees are exempt from the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion and the Emergency Paid Sick Leave provisions of the Family First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Now that the Department of Labor (DOL) released FAQs regarding the FFCRA, we know a bit more about how the DOL will count employees for the purpose of meeting the 500 employee threshold – including that it will apply the Fair Labor Standards Act’s (FLSA) joint-employer analysis and the Family and Medical Leave Act’s (FMLA) integrated employer test in making that determination. Now seems like as good a time as any for a brief refresher on the two tests.

FLSA Joint Employer Analysis

Under the FLSA, separate companies may become joint employers of an employee if both companies exercise control over the same employee. For example, say two companies benefit from an individual’s work but only one company designates the individual as their employee. To determine whether the two companies are the individual’s joint employer, the DOL would consider whether the second company exercises significant control over the employee’s work, including whether the second company:

  • hires or fires the employee;
  • supervises and controls the employee’s work schedule or conditions of employment to a substantial degree;
  • determines the employee’s rate and method of payment; and
  • maintains the employee’s employment records.

Employers with 500 or more employees under the above FLSA joint employer analysis are not subject to either the FFCRA’s paid sick leave or paid FMLA leave provisions.

FMLA Integrated Employer Test

Under the FMLA, separate companies may be considered to be part of a single employer if they are an “integrated employer,” determined by considering the following factors:

  • The companies share common management;
  • The companies’ operations are interrelated;
  • The companies share control of labor relations; and
  • The companies share common ownership and/or financial control

Employers with 500 or more employees under the FMLA’s integrated employer test are not subject to the FFCRA’s paid FMLA leave provision – but, unless they have 500 or more employees under the FLSA’s joint employer analysis, may still be subject to the paid sick leave provision.

Each of the above tests are complicated, and the FFCRA remains subject to pending DOL guidance and regulations. As a result, any employers with questions or concerns regarding their joint employer or integrated employer status – or anything else relating to the FFCRA – should consult with counsel.