Tag Archives: Illinois’ Prevailing Wage Act (IPWA)

In Case it was Ever in Doubt, the Illinois Prevailing Wage Act Now Expressly Adopts UNION SCALE to Establish Prevailing Wage in the “Construction” Industry

Contributed by Jeff Risch, June 18, 2019

scale weighing money and time. financial concept. illustration in flat design on blue background

Organized labor wasted no time in securing Governor Pritzker’s signature on legislation that undoubtedly calls for the Illinois prevailing wage rate to fall in lock step with the area union contracts. Per the new law, now in effect, the prevailing rate of wages paid to individuals covered under Illinois’ prevailing wage law shall not be less than the rate that prevails for work of a similar character on public works in the locality in which the work is performed under collective bargaining agreements, or understandings between employers or employer associations and bona fide labor organizations relating to each craft or type of worker or mechanic needed to execute the contract or perform such work, and collective bargaining agreements or understandings and successor agreements — so long as said employers or members of said employer associations employ at least 30% of the laborers, workers, or mechanics in the same trade or occupation in the locality where the work is being performed. To be even clearer, the Illinois Department of Labor is the sole government entity to decide the prevailing wage rates.

Of course, contractors may legally challenge the IDOL’s determinations through what is often cited as the Section 9 Hearing process. This procedure is part of the Illinois Prevailing Wage Act. Written objections to any published rate must be timely presented (no less than 30 days following the publication by the IDOL on its website). In the event it is determined, after a written objection is filed and a hearing is held, before an Administrative Law Judge with the IDOL, that less than 30% of the laborers, workers, or mechanics in a particular trade or occupation in the locality where the work is performed receive a collectively bargained rate of wage, then the average wage paid to such laborers, workers, or mechanics in the same trade or occupation in the locality for the 12-month period preceding the Department of Labor’s annual determination shall be the prevailing rate of wage. So, in other words, the burden is squarely on the objector and the cards are clearly stacked.

Curiously, the IDOL does not adopt other aspects of the dominant area union contract for prevailing wage purposes such as: overtime rules, traveling rates or weekend/holiday scale. Accordingly, many union contractors get caught up with prevailing wage issues in Illinois.

Bottom line: Anyone who performs construction work in Illinois needs to be intimately familiar with Illinois’ prevailing wage law. It has one of the more complex and, arguably, the most overbearing prevailing wage laws in the United States. Interestingly, in recent years, more and more states are getting away from prevailing wage laws.

Critical Illinois Prevailing Wage Law Change Impacting Contractors

Contributed by Jeffrey A. Risch, February 26, 2019

www.illinoisprevailingwage.com

You may not remember… in 2013, then Governor Quinn signed into law an amendment to Illinois’ Prevailing Wage Act (IPWA) which sort of redefined what the PREVAILING WAGE RATE meant by adding one little word.  Effective January 1, 2014, the IPWA defined “general prevailing rate of hourly wages” as hourly cash wages plus ANNUALIZED fringe benefits.  By inserting the word ANNUALIZED, the law arguably changed. 

For years, many contractors paid the prevailing wage fringe benefits as cash sums added to the employee paycheck based on prevailing wage hours only. Some contractors established bona fide defined contribution plans that provide 100% immediate vesting of the prevailing wage fringe benefit (in whole or in part); usually in the form of health/welfare or retirement savings. The advantages for the worker are obvious. The money is solely and exclusively in the control of the worker to do with it however they deem appropriate. In exchange for such a rich and rewarding benefit, some plans specifically limit the contribution to only those hours actually worked on “public works projects” (aka prevailing wage projects).

Well… in 2013, Big Labor went to the Illinois Legislature and successfully lobbied for the addition of the term “annualized”. Therefore, effective for all work performed on January 1, 2014 and thereafter, the Illinois Department of Labor can audit fringe benefit contributions made under a defined contribution plan, or declared by a contractor in its certified transcripts of payroll, and will calculate those contributions over all hours worked in a given period of time.

To establish the proper hourly calculation for allowable fringe benefits, contractors are expected to divide the total amount they contribute to a bona fide fringe benefit plan by the total of all hours worked (including non-prevailing wage projects). According to the Illinois Department of Labor, a contractor cannot exclusively take the hours worked and contributions made on public works/prevailing wage jobs to comply with the hourly fringe benefit component.  An example used by the Illinois Department of Labor includes: If a contractor contributes $520 per month for single insurance coverage, and the employee works 2080 hours (40 x 52 weeks), then the effective annual contribution rate is determined by dividing $6,240 ($520 x 12) by 2080 which equals $3.00 per hour. If the health and welfare portion of the prevailing wage is $5.05 per hour, the contractor can take a credit of $3.00 per hour and must pay $2.05 ($5.05-$3.00) additional on the hourly base wage.  The same formula will be applied to Pension, Annuity, 401(k) plans, Training, and Vacation in some localities that are funded by the contractor.

What’s remarkable is that the annualization of fringe benefits has been part of the federal prevailing wage law under Davis-Bacon & Related Acts (DBRA) for years. However, the United States Department of Labor has always allowed contractors to pay the fringe benefit component based on prevailing wage hours worked only provided the monies went directly and immediately to the worker. The Illinois Department of Labor could adopt a similar approach. However, Big Labor will certainly do everything it can to ensure that does not happen. 

What does this actually mean?

The IPWA allows for certain fringe benefits (Health and Welfare, Pension/Annuity, US DOL Training, and Vacation in some localities) to be considered in establishing a prevailing wage rate.  The prevailing wage rate includes an HOURLY base portion and a FRINGE BENEFIT portion. Contractors may choose to pay the entire prevailing wage rate in the base hourly rate component (and not take a credit for fringe benefits paid), or they may choose to take credit for certain allowed fringe benefits.  If a contractor does not pay any allowable fringe benefit or just a portion of it, then according to the Illinois Department of Labor, the difference must be made up in the hourly base wage rate in order to comply with this ANNUALIZATION component to the law. Alternatively, all fringe benefit contributions must be determined by dividing the TOTAL fringe benefit payout with ALL HOURS worked. Therefore, the fringe benefit contribution would be diluted in proportion to the non-prevailing wage hours worked by the employee.

So… while this is yesterday’s news, the Illinois Department of Labor under Governor Rauner was not extraordinarily aggressive on this annualization issue.  However, under new leadership, contractors should recognize that the Illinois Department of Labor is actively enforcing the annualization component of the law.  And, with a 5 year statute of limitations period, bad habits established or just plain ignorance of the law that may have went unchecked under the Rauner administration will cost you if you are not fully and completely in compliance with Illinois’ annualization obligation. 

BOTTOM LINE:  If you are performing public work in Illinois, you need to intimately understand Illinois’ prevailing wage law and the many pitfalls that exist under it. The stakes for not knowing or understanding how the Illinois Department of Labor views certain issues are just too high.